Parrots in Pakistan Dogs in Pakistan Cats in Pakistan
Post a Free Ad
 

Belgian Shepherd

 

Description:

The Belgian Sheepdog, one of four Belgian Sheepdogs, is a medium-sized, slender, square proportioned dog in the sheepdog family. He has a strong look to him with a solid muscular body with hind legs that are also muscular The front legs are straight and perfectly proportioned to the body with round catlike feet.
The Belgian Sheepdog is a lively and happy dog known for their loyalty and protectiveness. They are happiest when they are doing something, specifically with their owner. They were originally bred as a herding dog and his herding instincts will still surface from time to time such as circle and nipping at heels. The Belgian Sheepdog has a very high intelligence, is easy to train, and is known for having a great sense of humor. If you could hear them laughing, you would. He is very gentle dog with this family members and people he knows well, but more guarded with strangers. They are very playful and always alert with their eyes erect constantly paying close attention to what is happening around them.
Height:Dogs.24-26inches.Bitches22-24inches.
Weight: Dogs 65-75 pounds .Bitches 60-70 pounds.

Life Span:

13 to 14 years

Litter Size:

Average 6 to 10 puppies

Coat:

The Belgian Sheepdog has a thick, double coat. The texture should be hard and dense, never woolly, silky, frizzy, fine, or wiry. The undercoat should be thick and profuse. In conformation shows dogs without an undercoat are heavily penalized.

Temprament:

The Belgian Sheepdog is a high-energy, highly versatile dog known for his loyalty and protectiveness. They develop very strong bonds with their owners. They thrive as members of highly active families, especially when given jobs to do. The Belgian Sheepdog is very quick to learn, highly trainable, very intelligent, and needs to be mentally stimulated. They enjoy obedience, schutzhund, agility, flyball, Frisbee, herding, sledding, and tracking.

They also work as search and rescue dogs, guide dogs, and therapy dogs If he gets bored, he will probably chew the rockers off your rocking chair and destroy your couch. The Belgian Sheepdog loves to be with his family, but can be wary of strangers.

They do best with a fenced-in yard, and they love to spend time playing outdoors. But this doesn't mean you can banish him to the yard. Belgian Sheepdogs need to be with their families. They are sensitive, affectionate dogs, who with proper love and discipline are happy, responsive, playful companions with a great sense of humor. They can live anywhere, country or suburban, as long as they get to use up their energy. They just need an owner who is willing to invest the necessary time and effort in training, exercising, socialization and bonding!

As a Watch Dog:

 They are alert and observant and make good watchdogs. They are naturally protective, and are even possessive. They might try to herd you and your kids. They do well with children. However, these are strong, energetic dogs, who might accidentally run into and knock over a child.

Grooming:
Belgian Shepherd Dogs only need periodic grooming to remove the dead hairs.

Exercise:
Belgian Shepherd Dogs do require plenty of exercise and most of these dogs love retrieving and playing with a ball. If they have adequate exercise then they will be calm when indoors.

 

Health Problems:

Belgian Sheepdoghas no major health concerns. Some minor concerns that have been seen are epilepsy, skin allergies, eye problems, excessive shyness, excessive aggressiveness and occasionally seen hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia. 

Living Conditions:

The Belgian Shepherd/Groenendael will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. The Groenendael can sleep outdoors, although he prefers to be with his people.

IDEAL OWNERS:

Belgian Shepherds do best with active, dog experienced owners in rural or suburban homes.

History:
Belgian Sheepdogs were already established as an important part of farm life in the 1700s, in Belgium. In the 1800s a group of breeders in conjunction with a veterinary school in the Brussels area. This resulted in the division of the breed into four varieties, the classification being dependent on their color and coat.